COVID-19 Update 31 January 2022

COVID-19 Update 31 January 2022

SALEM:

  • Salem since last update: 335 new cases
  • Total: 6,590 confirmed cases in Salem. Last week: 6,360
  • Active cases: 133. Last week: 260
  • 1 out of every Salem residents have had confirmed infections.
  • Salem’s new cases per 100K for 14 days: 1,434 (2,788 last week)
  • Salem’s Positivity Rate for the past 7 days: 17.0% (17.1% last week.) 
  • Fully vaccinated Salem residents: 49.9% (+20 people since last week). 

NEW HAMPSHIRE:

  • New cases of COVID-19 in NH this week by math (Total cases last week compared to total cases today): 19,063 (29,242 last week)
  • New cases of COVID-19 in NH this week as reported by DHHS: 11,637.
  • 1 out of every 5 NH residents has been infected.
  • Active COVID-19 cases in NH: 10,436 (15,641 last week)
  • Recovered in NH this week: 27,015 
  • State Level of Transmission: Substantial in all counties 
  • New patients hospitalized this week because of COVID-19: 159 (Last week: 76)
  • Current patients hospitalized because of COVID-19: 303 (Last week: 411)
  • New admissions to ICU this week because of COVID-19: 37 (Last week: 20)
  • New deaths attributed to COVID-19 reported in NH this week: 74 (Last week: 66)
  • Fully vaccinated NH Residents: 56.4% (+1,304 since last week)

If you test positive using an at-home test, self-report your positive test result by calling 603-271-6996. 


Hello, Salem!

Random thoughts from this week:

Just over 2 years ago now, on January 20, 2020, the CDC confirms the first U.S. laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 in the U.S. from samples taken on January 18 in Washington state.

Useful links:

From the Governor’s press conference

  • Governor has announced that the State will sell 1 million Rapid Test kits at cost … at the State Liquor stores. (There are about 75-80 stores. They will have them in the stock “in the next couple of weeks.” Some states are having orders cancelled, so we will believe it when they come. They will be distributed based on demand and need. Federal funds to be used to purchase these. Proceeds will be used to purchase additional tests; this funding will not go back into the general fund. You may be able to use private health insurance to get reimbursed.
  • Antivirals are helping with Omicron, but monoclonal antibodies are not efficient with this variant. The new antivirals are not expected to be available in decent quantities until spring/summer.
  • The Commissioner reported that those in institutions who are diagnosed with COVID are isolated from non-infected residents. THAT IS NOT TRUE! I have a friend who is recovering from a stroke, and has been in a nursing home since March. His roommate was recently diagnosed, but neither of them were moved. Naturally, my friend was also infected a few days later. The facility is still on the State’s list of outbreaks … although they are allowing vaccinated visitors in to see residents.
  • There will be a shift in data as more at-home test kits are used. The severe outcomes – hospitalization and deaths – will become more important. However, tracking the case trajectory over time will continue to be important, even if the numbers aren’t as accurate as they were.
  • Several new walk-in vaccine and booster locations are now open in NH, including one here in Salem. The State’s website with the info about Vaccine Fixed Sites is down as I’m writing this on Sunday, so the hours and location are not available.

A friend reports that they had symptoms of COVID, and were able to get one test for COVID-19, Influenza A and Influenza B at CVS. (Happily, he was negative for all three). 

More kids are being diagnosed with COVID-19, and more of them are having more serious reactions. Details here.

Does COVID-19 increase kids’ risk of diabetes? And does diabetes increase kids reactions to COVID-19? This story discusses possible links, although some experts think it’s too early to know.

New variant of Omicron: BA.2

  • Omicron BA.2 is growing exponentially in Denmark, England and Germany. 
  • This week, scientists detected cases of it in several U.S. states, including California, Texas and Washington. Now nearly half of the states have confirmed the presence of BA.2, with at least 127 known cases as of Friday.
  • There’s growing evidence that it’s just as contagious as — or possibly a bit more contagious than — the first omicron variant, called “omicron BA.1.”
  • Some scientists say it’s 1.5 times more contagious than BA.1; others believe it to be 1% to 3% more transmissible.
  • Scientists currently do not believe that BA.2 has an increased risk in going to the hospital when compared to BA.1.
  • BA.2 doesn’t appear to further reduce the effectiveness of vaccines against symptomatic infection.
  • For now, the original version, known as BA.1, and BA.2 are considered subsets of omicron. But global health leaders could give it its own Greek letter name if it is deemed a globally significant “variant of concern.” Some reporters have dubbed BA.2 as “Stealth Omicron.”
  • Since BA.2 is still new, much is still to be learned. Details on what we are being told can be found here and here and here.

Personal frustrations:

I am a touch typist. My computr is ying. It rally stinks whn you los your “” an “” kys! Nw computr has bn on orr for a littl bit, but is still wks away. Copying an pasting th missing lttrs is a pain in th you-know-what! 

Edited on my iPad, which is hunt and peck:
I am a touch typist. My computer is dying. It really stinks when you lose your “e” and “d” keys! New computer has been on order for a little bit, but is still weeks away. Copying and pasting the missing letters is a pain in the you-know-what! 

Happily, this problem is intermittent. The above was written earlier in the week. It’s working, now! Hopefully it won’t impact future reports.

My next update is scheduled for next Monday. In the meantime, be smart, stay safe, and always, be kind. 

~Bonnie 


On Tuesday, January 25, 2022, DHHS announced 724 new positive test results for COVID-19 for Monday, January 24. Today’s results include 420 people who tested positive by PCR test and 304 who tested positive by antigen test. DHHS also announced an additional 74 new cases from Tuesday, January 11 (10 by PCR and 64 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,622; an additional 10 new cases from Thursday, January 13 (10 by PCR and 0 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,778; an additional 24 new cases from Friday, January 14 (17 by PCR and 7 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,256; an additional 2 new cases from Saturday, January 15 (1 by PCR and 1 by antigen test) for a new total of 5,535; an additional 8 new cases from Monday, January 17 (0 by PCR and 8 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,829; an additional 2 new cases from Tuesday, January 18 (0 by PCR and 2 by antigen test) for a new total of 741; an additional 1 new case from Wednesday, January 19 (0 by PCR and 1 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,749; an additional 5 new cases from Thursday, January 20 (0 by PCR and 5 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,310; an additional 8 new cases from Friday, January 21 (0 by PCR and 8 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,913; and an additional 2 new cases from Saturday, January 22(0 by PCR and 2 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,318. There are now 13,667 current COVID-19 cases diagnosed in New Hampshire. 

On Tuesday, DHHS also reported five additional deaths that occurred more than two weeks ago. Thes deaths occurred from he week of November 29 to the week of December 27. They included one person in their 50’s, and four who were 60 or older, and included on male from Rockingham County.

On Wednesday, January 26, 2022, DHHS announced 1,023 new positive test results for COVID-19 for Tuesday, January 25. Today’s results include 729 people who tested positive by PCR test and 294 who tested positive by antigen test. DHHS also announced an additional 47 new cases from Tuesday, January 11 (0 by PCR and 47 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,669; an additional 211 new cases from Wednesday, January 12 (2 by PCR and 209 by antigen test) for a new total of 4,241; an additional 42 new cases from Thursday, January 13 (7 by PCR and 35 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,820; an additional 72 new cases from Friday, January 14 (36 by PCR and 36 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,328; an additional 92 new cases from Saturday, January 15 (74 by PCR and 18 by antigen test) for a new total of 5,627; an additional 8 new cases from Tuesday, January 18 (0 by PCR and 8 by antigen test) for a new total of 749; an additional 6 new cases from Wednesday, January 19 (0 by PCR and 6 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,755; an additional 4 new cases from Thursday, January 20 (0 by PCR and 4 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,314; an additional 7 new cases from Friday, January 21 (3 by PCR and 4 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,920; and an additional 145 new cases from Monday, January 24 (63 by PCR and 82 by antigen test) for a new total of 869. There are now 13,870 current COVID-19 cases diagnosed in New Hampshire. 

On Thursday, January 27, 2022, DHHS announced 1,941 new positive test results for COVID-19 for Wednesday, January 26. Today’s results include 1,490 people who tested positive by PCR test and 451 who tested positive by antigen test. DHHS also announced an additional 77 new cases from Wednesday, January 12 (1 by PCR and 76 by antigen test) for a new total of 4,318; an additional 64 new cases from Thursday, January 13 (0 by PCR and 64 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,883; an additional 23 new cases from Friday, January 14 (13 by PCR and 10 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,351; an additional 57 new cases from Saturday, January 15 (39 by PCR and 18 by antigen test) for a new total of 5,684; an additional 68 new cases from Sunday, January 16 (55 by PCR and 13 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,880; an additional 11 new cases from Tuesday, January 18 (2 by PCR and 9 by antigen test) for a new total of 760; an additional 1 new case from Wednesday, January 19 (0 by PCR and 1 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,756; an additional 2 new cases from Friday, January 21 (0 by PCR and 2 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,922; an additional 2 new cases from Saturday, January 22 (0 by PCR and 2 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,320; an additional 6 new cases from Monday, January 24 (0 by PCR and 6 by antigen test) for a new total of 875; and an additional 22 new cases from Tuesday, January 25 (10 by PCR and 12 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,045. There are now 14,542 current COVID-19 cases diagnosed in New Hampshire. 

On Friday, January 28, 2022, DHHS announced 2,004 new positive test results for COVID-19 for Thursday, January 27. Today’s results include 1,527 people who tested positive by PCR test and 477 who tested positive by antigen test. DHHS also announced an additional 206 new cases from Thursday, January 13 (7 by PCR and 199 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,088; an additional 59 new cases from Friday, January 14 (18 by PCR and 41 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,410; an additional 7 new cases from Saturday, January 15 (7 by PCR and 0 by antigen test) for a new total of 5,691; an additional 81 new cases from Sunday, January 16 (66 by PCR and 15 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,961; an additional 26 new cases from Monday, January 17 (11 by PCR and 15 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,849; an additional 14 new cases from Tuesday, January 18 (13 by PCR and 1 by antigen test) for a new total of 773; an additional 1 new case from Thursday, January 20 (1 by PCR and 0 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,311; an additional 1 new case from Friday, January 21 (0 by PCR and 1 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,918; and an additional 37 new cases from Wednesday, January 26 (9 by PCR and 28 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,968. There are now 14,677 current COVID-19 cases diagnosed in New Hampshire. 

On Monday, January 31, 2022, DHHS announced 486 new positive test results for COVID-19 for Sunday, January 30. Today’s results include 410 people who tested positive by PCR test and 76 who tested positive by antigen test. DHHS also announced 1,598 cases from Friday, January 28(1,119 by PCR and 479 by antigen test); and 1,187 cases from Saturday, January 29 (1,040 by PCR and 147 by antigen test). Additionally, DHHS announced an additional 26 new cases from Thursday, January 13 (1 by PCR and 25 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,109; an additional 250 new cases from Friday, January 14 (17 by PCR and 233 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,655; an additional 30 new cases from Saturday, January 15(9 by PCR and 21 by antigen test) for a new total of 5,710; an additional 64 new cases from Sunday, January 16 (39 by PCR and 25 by antigen test) for a new total of 3,024; an additional 208 new cases from Monday, January 17 (71 by PCR and 137 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,055; an additional 326 new cases from Tuesday, January 18 (173 by PCR and 153 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,099; an additional 169 new cases from Wednesday, January 19 (67 by PCR and 102 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,917; an additional 8 new cases from Thursday, January 20 (5 by PCR and 3 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,319; an additional 5 new cases from Friday, January 21 (3 by PCR and 2 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,923; an additional 5 new cases from Saturday, January 22 (4 by PCR and 1 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,319; an additional 8 new cases from Tuesday, January 25 (8 by PCR and 0 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,038; an additional 12 new cases from Wednesday, January 26(10 by PCR and 2 by antigen test) for a new total of 1,975; and an additional 28 new cases from Thursday, January 27 (14 by PCR and 14 by antigen test) for a new total of 2,027. There are now 10,436 current COVID-19 cases diagnosed in New Hampshire. 

Each day, DHHS says that “Test results for previous days are still being processed and updated case counts for prior days will be reflected on the COVID-19 interactive dashboard.” And, “Several cases are still under investigation. Additionalinformation from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates.” 


• • • • • • POTENTIAL FLAWS IN COUNTS • • • • • • 

These numbers do not allow for those who self-diagnosed, or who have taken at-home tests. If you test positive using an at-home test, self-report your positive test result by calling 603-271-6996. 

• • • • • • DIAGNOSTIC TESTS IN NH — CUMULATIVE CASES • • • • • • 

  • Total people who have tested positive: 276,856. (Last week: 265,140)
  • New positive cases reported this week by math (Comparison of total number of cases last week to now): 19,063.  (Last week: 29,242)
  • New positive cases per DHHS: 28,864
  • 1 out of every 5 Salem residents has been infected.
  • 1 out of every 5 residents of Rockingham County.  (Was 1:6 last week)
  • 1 out of every 5 residents of NH have been infected. (Was 1:6 last week)

• • • • • ACTIVE CASES • • • • • • 

  • 10,436 (Last week: 15,641)
  • This number probably reflects:
    • At home testing not being reported
    • A decrease in new cases
    • Faster “recovery” times based on new CDC guidelines.

• • • • • • RECOVERED • • • • • •

  • Total recovered: 237,196 
  • Recovered this week: 16,857
  • Percentage of diagnosed cases that have recovered: 93.8%
  • “Recovered” is considered no longer contagious, but 1/3-1/2 have or will develop long-term effects

• • • • • COMMUNITY TRANSMISSION • • • • • • 

  • Every county in NH, as well as Manchester and Nashua, are at Substantial risk for community transmission.
  • Cases per 100K NH residents: 1,749 (2,798 last week.)
  • Positivity Rate for NH for the past week: 14.8% (17.5% last week.)
  • Salem’s Positivity Rate is now 17.0%. Last week was the first time that Salem’s positivity rate has been lower than the State’s, but we are now once again higher than the State average.
  • When the positivity rate is high, it is likely that cases are undercounted.
  • Positivity rates do not allow for those who self-diagnosed, or who have taken at-home tests.

• • • • • • HOSPITALIZATIONS IN NH • • • • • • 

  • Currently hospitalized: 363 (Last week: 411). 
  • Staffed hospital beds available: 13.3% (Last week: 11.4)
  • Total patients who have been hospitalized with COVID-19: 3,200 (3,052 last week) 
  • New patients hospitalized this week because of COVID-19: 159 (76 last week)
  • Total ICU patients: 882
  • New admissions to ICU this week because of COVID-19: 32. (Last week: 20)
  • Staffed adult ICU beds available: 11.4% (Last week: 11.1%)
  • NY Times reports that of 8 hospitals surrounding Salem, there is an average of 33 COVID-19 patients, an average of 1 ICU bed available, and an average of 87% ICU occupancy. 
  • DHHS says hospital capacity info is, “For Informational Purposes Only. If you need care, seek care. Hospitals are available to meet your medical needs.
  • Ventilators available: 79.4%
  • Per WMUR: 36.3% of NH hospitalizations are unvaccinated, 19.9% are fully up-to-date; 25.7% are partially up-to-date, and 18.2% are of unknown vaccine status.

• • • • • • DEATHS IN NH • • • • • • 

  • Total fatalities in NH associated with COVID-19: 2,209
  • New deaths attributed to COVID-19 reported in NH since my last update: 74 (Last week: 66)

• • • • • • BY AGES • • • • • •

  • 3,300 children under 18 are included in this week’s new cases. 
  • 28.4% of new cases announced by DHHS this week are kids under 18 years old. 
  • Under 60, this week: 10,220 new cases. 55 hospitalizations; 10 deaths
  • 60+, this week: 1,496 new cases; 93 hospitalizations; 54 deaths

• • • • • • Institutional Outbreaks in NH • • • • • •  

  • NH DHHS reported 47 institutional outbreaks as of Wednesday, January 26. There were 42 institutions last week and 37 the previous week.
  • In Salem:
    • Salem Haven is still reported as having 32 residents and 20 staff infected, and four deaths.
    • Greystone Farm is still reporting 9 residents and 5 staff that have been infected.
  • Details about these active outbreaks, and all closed outbreaks, can be seen here.
  • This week: 461 people from long-term care facilities were diagnosed bringing the total to 11,237. 415 were hospitalized (423 total), 10 died (1,063 total). 
  • This week: 360 healthcare workers were diagnosed, bringing the total to 9,388. was hospitalized (110 total). 1 died (17 total).

• • • • • • VARIANTS IN NH • • • • • •  

A percentage of NH’s positive test results are sequenced for the variants. Per WMUR, of the positive cases that were sequenced, NH has had:

  • Number of B.1.1.7 variant (Alpha) cases: 1,262 (No change)
  • Number of B.1.351 variant (Beta) cases: 2 (No change)
  • Number of P.1 variant (Gamma) cases: 203 (No change)
  • Number of B.1.617.2 variant (Delta) cases: 4,924 (Last week: 4,869)
  • Number of B.1.1.529 variant (Omicron): 688 (Last week: 619) 

These are not simply numbers. We must not forget that these are all someone’s husband or wife, mother or father, sister or brother, son or daughter, friend or neighbor.





Which Booster should I get?

Chart based on data at:
https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-10-26/which-booster-shot-should-i-get-heres-how-to-chose?

FINDING INFORMATION:

The State lists information on where to get vaccinated, where to get tested, and what to do if you test positive or were exposed to COVID on their website.


COVID-19 SYMPTOMS – Updated early September 2021

Concerns continue to grow for the Delta variant of COVID-19, which now accounts for 93% of all new COVID-19 infections. Descriptions of symptoms have been updated:

Ranking of Symptoms for Covid-19 Infection in the Unvaccinated

  1. Headache
  2. Sore Throat
  3. Runny Nose
  4. Fever
  5. Persistent cough 

Loss of smell now comes in at number 9, and shortness of breath is way down the list at number 30.

Ranking of Symptoms for Covid-19 Infection in the Partially Vaccinated

  1. Headache
  2. Runny Nose
  3. Sore throat
  4. Sneezing
  5. Persistent Cough

Sneezing, which was never thought to be a symptom in the original Covid strain, is now ranked more common than a cough, for a reported symptom in those with only one dose of the vaccine.

Ranking of Symptoms for Covid-19 Infection in the Fully Vaccinated

  1. Headache
  2. Runny Nose
  3. Sneezing
  4. Sore throat
  5. Loss of smell

A cough ranks 8 on the list for fully vaccinated people, and a fever ranks 12. Shortness of breath is way down the list at number 29.



Useful links

Sources used to create these reports:

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