COVID-19 Update October 25

COVID-19 Update October 25

  • Total: 389 confirmed cases in Salem
  • 1 out of 76 Salem residents have been infected
  • Salem Today: 5 new cases, 33 active cases 

Community Transmission (per NH Department of Health and Human Services)

The overall level of community transmission is defined using three metrics.  A community is then assigned an overall level based on the highest-level determination for any specific metric. The metric which is changing the most right now is the number of new cases.

  • NH Community Transmission Metrics:
    • New Cases per 100k over 14 days
      • Scale: Minimal: <50; Moderate: 50 – 100; Substantial: >100. 
      • Today: 1,189 cases; Daily average: 87.0 (Moderate)
    • New hospitalizations per 100k over 14 days:
      • Scale: Minimal: <10; Moderate: 10 – 20; Substantial: >20, 
      • Today: Total hospitalizations: 9 total; Daily average: 0.7%
    • Average PCR Test Positivity Rate over 7 days:
      • Scale: Minimal: <5%; Moderate: 5% – 10%; Substantial: >10%
      • Today: Tests over last 7 days: 527.  Total. PCR Tests over last 7 days: 38,311 Daily average: 1.4%
    • Today’s Level of Transmission: Moderate
  • Rockingham County Transmission:
    • New Cases per 100k over 14 days100.3
    • New hospitalizations per 100k over 14 days: 0.6
    • Average PCR Test Positivity Rate over 7 days: 1.8
    • Rockingham County Transmission: Substantial 
  • Other NH Locations, with changes from yesterday
    • Manchester: Substantial. (137.9 new case average; 2.7 hospitalizations; 2.5% positivity.) 
    • Nashua: Substantial (128.7 new case average; 2.2 hospitalizations; 2.2% positivity.)
    • Merrimack: Substantial (108.5 new case average; 0.7 hospitalizations; 1.7% positivity)
    • Hillsborough County excluding Manchester and Nashua (98.5 new case average): [Was 93.4 yesterday, 89.6 two days ago.] Moderate
    • Belknap County (78.7 new case average): Moderate
    • Strafford County (61.5 new case average): Moderate
    • Coos County (53.8 new case average): Moderate
    • Grafton County (33.4 new case average): Minimal
    • Carroll County (20.5 new case average): Minimal
    • Sullivan County (25.5 new case average): Minimal
    • Cheshire County (30.1 new case average): Minimal
  • Changes to New Cases per 100K for NH, all counties, and our two largest cities:
    • Manchester and Strafford Counties went down slightly.
    • All others went up some.
    • Rockingham County had enough new cases to make it a Substantial level of transmission.
    • Coos County had enough new cases to put it in the Moderate category.

• • • • • • TODAY’S SPOTLIGHT • • • • • •

  • Another five more Salem residents were diagnosed with COVID-19. We’ve had 40 new people diagnosed in the last two weeks. Come on, Salem. We can do better than that!
  • Salem now has 33 people who are considered to be infectious, an increase of 5 from yesterday. This is the most since July 11.
  • 92 people were diagnosed today according to NH DHHS. (From yesterday to day, the total number went up by 90). It’s Sunday. We usually see a decrease on Sundays.
  • The number of active cases is back over 1,000.
  • We have approximately 4,450 persons being monitored in NH, the highest I’ve ever seen. It appears to me that the contact tracers aren’t keeping up with the demand, which means that there are more people out in the public who are infected. According to WMUR, possible exposure at the Barley House in Concord from Friday, October 9 to Sunday, October 18 was still being investigated on Oct 24.
  • Only 4 people were recovered today.
  • We only had one new hospital patient today, but we are now up to 23 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, up from yesterday’s 19.
  • Communities:
    • Notable changes in active cases from yesterday to today:
      • We are back to 10 communities with more than 20 active cases. Between them, these 10 communities have 486 total active cases, accounting for 47% of all active cases. (Shown: # of active cases and change from yesterday). 
        • Manchester: 128 (+2). Nashua: 83 (+9). Concord: 51 (+5). Bedford: 51 (+2). Warner: 44 (Unchanged). Hudson: 35 (+6). Salem: 33 (+5). Derry: 33 (+2). Portsmouth: 28 (+2).  Durham: 22 (+3).
        • Durham is now back to having more than 20 active cases, so is back in this list.
    • Some of the communities with significant changes in cumulative cases: 
      • Nashua (+9). Hudson and Manchester (+6). Concord, Milford, Salem (+5). Goffstown (+4). Durham (+3).
  • Massachusetts has now diagnosed over 150,000 people with COVID-19.

• • • • • • DIAGNOSTIC TESTS IN NH • • • • • • 

  • New positive cases by my math (Total of today’s cases minus yesterday’s total): 90
  • New positive cases per DHHS: 92
    • 69 PCR tests
    • 23 Antigen tests
  • Children under 18 in new cases: 12
  • Total positive cases in NH: 10,328
  • Percentage of today’s tests that are positive per DHHS: 0.8%
  • Total PCR tests results reported today (Positive results plus negative results: 2,504
  • The daily average of diagnostic (PCR) tests reported from 7 days ago to today: 2,394
  • New negative results reported today: 2,414
  • Total negative cases in NH: 321,233

• • • • • • ROCKINGHAM COUNTY • • • • • •

  • Total cases in Rockingham County: 2,534
  • New cases in Rockingham County: 23
  • Rockingham County: New cases per 100K residents: 7.4
  • Rockingham County 1-week average per 100K residents: 7.8
  • Rockingham County Positivity Rate: 1.8%
  • Percent of all cases from Rockingham County: 24.5%
  • Percent of all cases from either Hillsborough County or Rockingham County: 77%

• • • • • • ACTIVE CASES • • • • • •

  • Active cases in NH: 1,032
  • Active cases in Rockingham County: 238
  • Percent of NH’s active cases that are in Rockingham County: 23.1%. 

• • • • • • OTHER TEST RESULTS • • • • • • 

  • New antibody tests: 37
  • Total antibody tests (No break downs of positive vs. negative): 31,995
  • The daily average of antibody tests reported from 7 days ago to today: 33

• • • • • • CHANGES BY AGES • • • • • • 

  • 0-9: +5 (3% of all cases. 6% of new cases)
  • 10-19: +12 (8% of all; 13% today) 
  • 20-29: +18 (18% of all; 20% today) 
  • 30-39: +16 (14% of all; +18% today)
  • 40-49: +13 (13% of all; 14% today)
  • 50-59: +9 (15% of all; 10% today)
  • 60-69: +15 (12% of all; 17% today)
  • 70-79: +3 (7% of all; 3% today) 
  • 80+: +0 (10% of all; 0% today)
  • Unknown: -1 (0% of all; -1% today)

• • • • • • RECOVERED IN NH • • • • • • 

  • Announced today: 4
  • Total Recovered: 8,823
  • Percentage of diagnosed cases that have recovered: 85.4%

• • • • • • HOSPITALIZATIONS IN NH • • • • • • 

  • New: 1
  • Current: 23
  • Total Hospitalized: 766
  • Percentage of those who have been infected that have been hospitalized: 7.42%

• • • • • • DEATHS IN NH • • • • • • 

  • Lives lost today: 0
  • Persons over 60 years of age who died today: 0
  • Persons under 60 years of age who died today: 0
  • Total fatalities in NH associated with COVID-19: 473
  • NH Residents diagnosed with COVID-19 that died: 4.58%
  • Lives lost in Rockingham today: 0

These are not simply numbers. We must not forget that these are all someone’s husband or wife, mother or father, sister or brother, son or daughter, friend or neighbor.


Hello, Salem!

The statistics talk about measurable numbers. We can see how many people die from COVID-19. We know that it is mostly the elderly who die. So no big deal (except to those who love the ones who would be alive if it wasn’t for COVID-19.)

What we can’t measure are the other consequences. This is a new disease. We’ve never seen anything like it before. It’s been in our country for 281 days; in NH 239 days. We’ve learned a lot in these days, but my guess is, we have more to still learn than what we already know.

We do know that some of the victims have multiple-organ damage: heart, lungs and/or liver. We know that some of those who have had heart damage are unaware of it. There’s brain damage. Recently scientists are reporting hair loss – possibly temporary. And now the medical community is reporting an increase in some kind of diabetes – possibly a new type of that disease — an insulin-dependent diabetes with significant insulin resistance.

And, COVID is a virus. We know that those who have the chicken pox virus can develop shingles, and those who get the HIV virus can develop AIDS. COVID-19 is still too new to know what, if anything, might develop from this virus in years to come.

Still further is the medical expenses of a severe COVID-19 infection. We hear of people with a million-dollar hospital bill, on top of lost wages.

I have compiled a collection of medical articles about multiple-organ impacts, impacts on the heart, lung, and brain. I’ve included a few articles on long-haulers – the people who struggle with no sign of recovery, long after they are considered to be no longer infectious. And now I’ve added hair loss and this new kind of diabetes to my collection. You can read ithere

This isn’t the flu, folks. Don’t become a statistic. Stay safe, and always, be kind.

~Bonnie




This screenshot comes from https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6942e2.htm?s_cid=mm6942e2_w

This report is explained here:
https://www.clickondetroit.com/health/2020/10/20/cdc-from-january-to-october-us-had-299k-more-deaths-than-in-previous-years/



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Useful links


Sources used to create these reports:

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